Our Faculty

Stephanie Orme

Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Studies, Department of English


Contact Information

617-732-1746


Office Hours

Office: Administration Building, Room 434C

Wednesdays and Fridays: 11:00 am - 1:00 p.m. 

Education

Ph.D. in Mass Communications, The Pennsylvania State University;
M.A. in Communication, Suffolk University;
B.S. in Communication, Illinois State University

Bio

I joined Emmanuel College's English department in 2020 as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Studies. I earned my B.S. in Communication from Illinois State University, an M.A. in Communication from Suffolk University, and a Ph.D. in Mass Communications from Penn State.

My research expertise is on geek culture and fan communities, with a focus on the global video game industry and gaming culture. Specifically, I am interested in how gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and disability influence the video game industry and player communities. I also study the comic book industry and comics fandom. I currently serve as the Chair of the Game Studies Division for the National Communication Association and as a founding board member for the Esports Research Network.

What I Love About Emmanuel:

I love the enthusiasm of Emmanuel students. They are bright, eager to learn, and excited to engage in conversations with their peers. They bring such great energy to the classroom, which really motivates me as a teacher.

  • ENGL1502: Introduction to Communication & Media Studies
  • ENGL2501: Journalism
  • ENGL3991: Special Topics: Video Games/Interactive Media

Publications:
  • Orme, S. (2018). The post-feminist politics of the “Everyone Can Make Games” movement. In A. Brock, K. L. Gray, D. J. Leonard (Eds.), Woke Gaming: Digital Challenges to Social Injustice. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.
  • McAllister, M. P., & Orme, S. (2018). Cinema’s discovery of the graphic novel: Mainstream and independent adaptation. In J. Baetens, H. Frey, & S. Tabachnick (Eds.), The Cambridge History of the Graphic Novel. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ferchaud, A., Grzeslo, J., Orme, S., & LaGroue, J. (2018). Parasocial attributes and YouTube personalities: Exploring content trends across the most subscribed YouTube channels. Computers in Human Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.10.041
  • McAllister, M. P., & Orme, S. (2017). The impact of digital media on advertising: Five cultural dilemmas. In P. Messaris & L. Humphreys (Eds.), Digital media: Transformations in human communication (2nd ed.) (pp. 71-78). New York: Peter Lang.
  • Orme, S. (2016). Femininity and fandom: The dual-stigmatization of female comic book fans. The Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics 7(4), 403-416.doi: 10.1080/21504857.2016.1219958
Presentations:
  • Ferchaud, A., Orme, S., and Daniel, E. S. (2020). Morality inside the matrix: A Qualitative Exploration of Gamers’ Moral Considerations Within Virtual Spaces. Presented at the 70th annual International Communication Conference, Virtual conference, May 20-26.
  • Orme, S. “gamers are just people who game”: Female players and identity in digital games culture.” (2018). Presented at the 104th annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Salt Lake City, UT, November 8-11.
  • Orme, S. “You don’t look like gamer: The body politics of gamer identities.” (2018). Presented at the 2018 Different Games Conference, Worcester, MA, October 12-14.
  • Orme, S. “Where my girls at?”: A textual analysis of #FineWomenThatGame. (2018). Presented at the 2018 Screentime BU Conference, Boston, MA, June 21.
  • Dardis, F., Schimerbach, M., Aviles, J, Bailey, E., Orme, S, and Kang, J. (2018). Make it fit: The effects of brand-game congruity in advergames on brand recall, attitude, and purchase intent. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Washington, D.C., August 6-9.
  • Orme, S. (2018). Reprogramming diversity in DIY game design. TEDx talk. University, Park, PA, February 11.
  • Orme, S. (2017) Glory to Arstotska: Nationalism, migration, and feminist politics in Papers, Please. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Dallas, TX, November 15-19.
  • Ferchaud, A., Grzeslo, J., Orme, S., & LaGroue, J. (2016). Parasocial attributes and YouTube personalities: Exploring content trends across the most subscribed YouTube channels. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Philadelphia, PA, November 9-13.
  • Orme, S. (2016). Hero or hermit?: Open world design, procedural rhetoric, and community in Skyrim. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Philadelphia, PA, November 9-13.
  • Aviles, J., Kumble, S., Schmierbach, M., Bailey, E., Waddell, F., Dardis, F., Huang, Y., Orme, S., Seeber, K., and Wu, M. (2016). Effects of music pacing in a nutrition game on flow and explicit and implicit attitudes. Paper presented at annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Minneapolis, MN, August 4-7.
  • Orme, S. (2015). Gatekeeping Gamergate: Wikipedia and the muting of feminist voices. Paper presented at the “Games as/with/through Communication: Introducing the Game Studies Division to NCA” preconference at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Las Vegas, NV, November 18-22.
  • Orme, S. (2012). Performance and politics: A dramaturgical analysis of Cablegate’s impact on U.S.-Russia diplomacy. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Orlando, FL, November 14-18.
  • Djung Yune Choi Graduate Teaching Award (Penn State)
  • Top Student Paper Award (NCA Game Studies Division)
  • The Don Davis Program in Ethical Leadership Award (Penn State)
  • Top Graduate Student Award (Suffolk University)
  • Graduate Student Fellowship (Suffolk University)

My research focuses on gender identity, race and ethnicity, sexuality, and disability in geek culture, with a particular focus on the video game industry and gaming culture. I often write about gendered and racial labor issues in the North American games industry, toxicity in geek culture, and "gamer" identity, but have been known to dabble in many areas including parasocial relationships and moral decision making in games.

Currently, I am working several projects including:
  • non-players who enjoy watching others play video games
  • moral-decision making in video games
  • parasocial relationships within Twitch streamers

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