Class Tradition: Junior Ring and Tassel Ceremony

As juniors, students participate in a tradition as old as the college itself: the ring ceremony. This history of the Emmanuel College ring began in the early 1920s and we continue to celebrate this tradition today.

The Junior Ring and Tassel Ceremony is an important tradition for juniors at Emmanuel as they celebrate their status as upper-class students. Juniors participating in the ceremony select an alumnus or current senior to present them with their ring and/or tassel to support them in their continued success at Emmanuel.

History

The Emmanuel College ring symbolizes the rich heritage of Emmanuel, serving as a reminder of an Emmanuel education and of the bonds students share with the Emmanuel community, especially with the graduates of the past nine decades.

When the students of the 1920s clamored for a college ring, President Sr. Helen Madeleine, SND, consulted prominent jewelers who submitted designs and prices, which she then brought to the faculty and students. Tiffany's of New York was the unanimous choice. The ring, in gold with a lapis lazuli stone, carries the college's colors. The seal of the college is engraved on the side of the ring. Today, students select their ring from a wide selection of styles.

1987 Epilogue: Traditional Class Ring

Engraved in our school ring is the College seal. In gold, at the base of the shield, is a trimount, which also appears on the arms of the archdiocese of Boston, symbolic of the fact that Boston was built on three hills. The use of the trimount on the arms identifies Emmanuel as a College in the archdiocese of Boston. Three lilies spring from the trimount, reminding us that the Sisters of Notre Dame originated in France, the land of the fleur-de-lis. The lilies support an open book, the symbol of learning. Across the pages of the book is inscribed the sacred name "Emmanuel," meaning "God with us," in the original Hebrew, so placed on the arms to signify that a knowledge of Christ the lord is the alm and crown of all learning. The stone in our traditional ring is the lapis lazuli. It symbolizes constancy, truth and honor, values that we strive to attain in our youth and those that we hope to maintain as graduates of Emmanuel College.

Junior Ring and Tassel Ceremony, Past and Present

2003 Epilogue: Ring Prayer

O Emmanuel, we ask your blessings as we gather before you today and receive our Emmanuel rings, making us now and always your children.

We ask that the ring be a symbol of this time in our lives, a time when we attempt to define in ourselves the meaning of community...

May the spirit of the Creator of all life be in us so that we may witness to the world a firm assurance of Emmanuel, God with us.

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